Rare Books Blog

Roscoe Pound's inscription to Irving M. Walker
October 16, 2013

Roscoe Pound’s inscribed copy (to Irving M. Walker) of his book Contemporary Juristic Theory (1940).

The son of a federal trial judge in Nebraska, Roscoe Pound graduated from the University of Nebraska in 1888. He attended Harvard Law School for a year and was admitted to the Nebraska bar in 1890. After practicing law in Lincoln for several years, he earned a doctorate in botany (1897). By 1899 he had begun teaching law at Nebraska, and he became dean of the law school in 1903. He then took positions at several major law schools: Northwestern (1907), Chicago (1909), and Harvard (1910). He stayed at Harvard 37 years and served as dean for 20.

A bibliography of Pound’s writings fills more than 200 pages. His first legal article was “Dogs and the Law,” which appeared in The Green Bag in 1896; his last, on the Federal Tort Claims Act, appeared in Tulane Law Review in 1963. The father of “sociological jurisprudence,” Pound was a major figure in legal philosophy.

The recipient of this inscribed volume was the prominent Los Angeles lawyer Irving M. Walker (1885–1968), of Loeb, Walker & Loeb.

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

John H. Wigmore's autograph
October 16, 2013

John H. Wigmore’s signed copy of his book A Kaleidoscope of Justice (1941).

John Henry Wigmore enrolled at Harvard Law School in 1884, became a founder of the Harvard Law Review and received his LL.B. in 1887. In 1889, he was offered a post as a foreign advisor to the Empire of Japan and taught law at Keio University in Tokyo. During this time, he became fascinated by comparative law, an interest he pursued throughout his life. After leaving Japan, Wigmore became a professor at Northwestern University Law School in 1893. During his tenure as dean (1901-1929), Northwestern rose to become one of the top law schools in the country.

His most significant and lasting contribution to American jurisprudence is his classic Treatise on the Anglo-American System of Evidence in Trials at Common Law (1904), which was later distilled into Wigmore’s Code of the Rules of Evidence in Trials at Law (3d ed. 1942).

This 1941 book, A Kaleidoscope of Justice, showcases Wigmore’s fascination with comparative law—as a companion volume to his Panorama of the World’s Legal Systems (1928). This signature is not as ostentatious as many of his others: often his flourishes filled the entire free endpaper.

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

October 16, 2013

We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of the following individuals in the preparation of this exhibit.

          — Bryan A. Garner & Mike Widener

Ryden Anderson
LawProse Inc.

Janet Conroy
Office of Public Affairs, Yale Law School

Karolyne H. C. Garner
LawProse Inc.

Ryan Greenwood
Lillian Goldman Law Library

Heather Haines
LawProse Inc.

Shana Jackson
Lillian Goldman Law Library

Becky McDaniel
LawProse Inc.

Jeff Newman
LawProse Inc.

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

Jerome Frank's inscription to Learned Hand
October 16, 2013

Judge Jerome Frank’s inscribed copy (to Learned Hand) of his book Fate and Freedom: A Philosophy for Free Americans (1945).

Jerome Frank (1889-1957) graduated from the University of Chicago Law School in 1912. As a lawyer, he specialized in corporate finance and reorganization. Frank’s first book, Law and the Modern Mind (1930), provided a psychoanalytical critique of the law that cemented his reputation as a legal realist. His other major work, Courts on Trial (1949), expressed his skepticism regarding how the judicial system determines “what the facts are.”

Frank made his principal contribution to American law as a judge on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. From his appointment in 1941 until his death, Frank wrote wide-reaching opinions that shaped the laws of obscenity, adhesion contracts, so-called “private attorneys-general,” and labor relations.

A few years ago I ordered this copy of Fate and Freedom from an Internet seller. When the book arrived, I found to my amazement that it was inscribed by Frank to Learned Hand, who served with Frank on the Second Circuit.

Frank’s assessment of Hand’s wisdom was no private matter. In a 1955 Yale Law School lecture, published in 1957 and anthologized in 1965, Frank declared: “Learned Hand, who both thinks deeply and feels deeply, sees life as a marvelous comic-tragedy. … He has a love for and an understanding of his fellow creatures, like him, humanly fallible. I commend him to you as a great man and as our wisest judge.”

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

Inscription of Justice O. W. Holmes Jr. to Lloyd Bowen
October 15, 2013

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes’s inscribed copy (to Lloyd W. Bowen) of his book Speeches (1900).

The son of a flamboyant author and physician, Justice Holmes was born in Boston and graduated from Harvard College in 1861. After three years of fighting in the Union Army during the Civil War, he graduated from Harvard Law School in 1866. While in private practice, he edited the 12th edition of Kent’s Commentaries on American Law (1873), and produced his classic text, The Common Law (1881). He joined the Harvard law faculty in 1882 and a year later was appointed to the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts. President Theodore Roosevelt appointed him to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1902.

This 1900 edition of Holmes’s Speeches is exceedingly hard to find. He inscribed this copy—years after its publication—for Lloyd W. Bowen, who was the Solicitor General of the United States. Bowen died of a brain hemorrhage less than five months after receiving this gift. The frontispiece reads, “These chance utterances of faith and doubt are printed for a few friends who will care to keep them.”

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

Justice O.W. Holmes Jr., autographed copy of farewell dinner menu
October 15, 2013

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes’s autographed—and seemingly personal—copy of the program and menu for the Boston dinner commemorating his appointment to the Supreme Court of the United States (Dec. 3, 1902).

Below Chief Justice Holmes’s portrait (taken in 1900) is his dated autograph in pencil, with the words “Chief Justice” written under his signature. On the inside front cover, also in Holmes’s hand, are the names of judges and other dignitaries present.

How this elaborate program was put together is something of a mystery. President Theodore Roosevelt made a recess appointment of Holmes to the Supreme Court on August 11, 1902. The formal nomination didn’t come until December 2, the day before this dinner took place. Holmes was confirmed on the 4th, the morning after this dinner. The printers must have been really good—and really fast. Then again, the timing may have been well known to the local judges through the help of U.S. Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, who spearheaded the effort to see Justice Holmes nominated.

At the end of the evening, Justice Holmes delivered one of his most famous quips. A member of the audience said, “Now justice will be administered in Washington!” to which Holmes is said to have called back: “Don’t be too sure. I am going there to administer the law.” (See Fred Shapiro, The Yale Book of Quotations 368 (2006)).

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

Justice William O. Douglas, inscription to Olla Bennett
October 15, 2013

Justice William O. Douglas’s inscribed copy (to Ola Bennett) of his book Of Men and Mountains (1950).

Justice William O. Douglas (1898-1980) was the longest-serving member of the Supreme Court of the United States. He worked his way through school, and eventually graduated fifth in the class of 1925 at Columbia Law School. He practiced briefly with a major firm before leaving to teach law, first at Columbia and then at Yale. He entered government service in 1934 and became an adviser to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937. When FDR appointed him to replace Justice Louis D. Brandeis in 1939, Douglas, at 40, was among the youngest justices ever to join the Supreme Court.

Douglas wrote the opinions in many spotlight cases, including Terminiello v. City of Chicago, 337 U.S. 1 (1949) and Griswold v. Connecticut, 81 U.S. 479 (1965). In 1950, after he granted a temporary stay of execution to Ethel and Julius Rosenberg—convicted as Soviet spies—Congress briefly considered impeaching him. And in 1970 future President Gerald R. Ford led impeachment hearings against Douglas, partly because of his business associations but also because of his “liberal opinions.”

Douglas was a prolific author on nonlegal matters, writing numerous books on history, politics, foreign relations, and—one of his favorite subjects—conservation, including A Wilderness Bill of Rights (1965) and the book displayed here, Of Men and Mountains (1950).

Douglas inscribed this copy “with warm regards and best wishes” to Ola Bennett, who at the time was an administrative assistant in the Farm Labor section of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

          – Bryan A. Garner

“Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers, from Bryan A. Garner’s Collection”, an exhibit curated by Bryan A. Garner with Mike Widener, is on display until December 16, 2013 in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

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