Research Courses Spring 2017

January 17, 2017

Here are the research courses offered Spring 2016. Please contact Julie Krishnaswami or John Nann if you have any questions.

ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH: METHODS AND SOURCES (“ALR”) (21027) 

Credit: 2 or 3 Units (variable course)
Offered:  Spring semester (full semester)
Target Audience: All levels. Students writing a substantial paper, who plan on clerking, or working in law practice.

An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to the other course requirements. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course.

RESEARCH METHODS IN AMERICAN LAW (21486)

Credit: 1 Unit
Offered: Spring semester (first seven weeks of the semester, before Spring Break)
Target Audience: All levels. Students who haven’t taken a legal research course before and who need a basic understanding of legal research principles.

This course, formerly Efficient Techniques in Legal Research, will instruct students in basic legal research skills, including researching federal case law, statutory and administrative law, as well as using secondary sources in the research process. Students will be required to complete a series of short research assignments. The course will meet once weekly for the first half of the term. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1 unit legal research course. Minimum enrollment of five required.

SPECIALIZED LEGAL RESEARCH IN CORPORATE LAW (21489)

Credit: 1 Unit
Offered: Spring Semester (first seven weeks of the semester, before Spring Break)
Target Audience: 2Ls, 3Ls and second semester 1Ls interested in corporate law

Course Description: This course will introduce students to legal research, focused on corporate law research in a law firm setting. Secondary sources and research techniques specific to the practice of corporate law will be covered. Research topics may include transactional legal research, current awareness, form finding and document construction, corporate and non-profit governance, practitioner’s tools, business and market research, competitive intelligence, financial analysis, regulatory research, and other relevant areas based on student interest. Students will be required to complete a series of in-class assignments. The course will meet once weekly for the first half of the term. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. Minimum enrollment of five. J. Eiseman and M. VanderHeijden.

RESEARCH METHODS IN STATUTORY AND REGULATORY LAW (21493-01)

Credit: 1 Unit
Offered:   Spring Semester (first seven weeks of the semester, before Spring Break)
Target Audience: 2Ls, 3Ls and second semester 1Ls interested in corporate law.

This course will teach students to research statutes, agency regulations, agency cases, and other sources of statutory and administrative law, using a variety of print and online sources. The goal of the course is to give students an understanding of the sophisticated research skills required for finding statutory and administrative authority in its various forms including: legislative history, enabling statutes, proposed and final agency regulations, decisions, opinions and policy and executive orders. Emphasis will be on researching using free, government resources, but students will also learn how to conduct regulatory research using directories and other databases. Although the primary focus of this course will be on researching federal statutory and administrative law, one class session will be devoted to researching state and local administrative law. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and on a final research project focused on a regulatory issue and agency of their choosing. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the first half of the term. J. Graves-Krishnaswami, S. Matheson, and M. VanderHeijden.

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