American law

The Rare Book Collection is excited to announce that it now has its own section in the Lillian Goldman Law Library’s eYLS Repository. Titled Yale Law Special...
Litchfield Historical Society
Michael von der Linn, lead curator of our current exhibit, “From Litchfield to Yale: Law Schools in Connecticut, 1782–1843,” will be speaking about the exhibit on April 19 at...
Michael von der Linn’s March 27 talk, “From Litchfield to Yale: Footnotes to the Exhibit,” is now available online in the Lillian Goldman Law Library’s Vimeo...
From Litchfield to Yale: Law Schools in Connecticut, 1782-1843An exhibition talkby Michael von der Linn Connecticut gave birth to the earliest American law schools, one of...
Baldwin, Simeon E. “Zephaniah Swift.” In Great American Lawyers (William Draper Lewis; ed.; Philadelphia: John C. Winston Company, 1907-1909). Fisher, Samuel H. Litchfield...
Affiliation with Yale helped to insure the continuity of Hitchcock and Daggett’s school. The others did not survive. Gilbert closed his school in Hebron around 1818. We’re...
A handful of college and college-affiliated law schools existed in the early decades of the nineteenth century. The College of William & Mary established a law department...
In Connecticut and elsewhere, instructors in the proprietary schools played a crucial and self-conscious role in the Americanization of the common law. Applying practical...
In the first quarter of the nineteenth century law books became widely available at affordable prices, thanks to the growth of the American publishing industry and improved...
Reeve, Gilbert, Gould, and Swift taught their students through lectures. This was the most common pedagogical system of the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. The...

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