English law

The Great Charter called in Latyn Magna Carta (London, 1542).
The Rare Book Collection’s Flickr site passed two milestones this summer, reaching over 3,000 images and over a million views. The site also sports a number of new...
Blackstone's Analysis of the Laws of England (1821)
“Blackstone’s Commentaries: A Work of Art?” An exhibition talk by Cristina S. Martinez, PhD University of Ottawa   Friday, April 17, 2015...
Blackstone's Commentaries (1765)
This year is the 250th anniversary of the publication of Sir William Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England, the single most influential book in the history...
Sir Edward Coke (1552-1634)
Books from our Rare Book Collection once again are the stars in a video by my friend Mark Weiner. The latest video is titled “On Looking into Coke’s Reports” and the...
Anthony Taussig
The “Celebration of the Anthony Taussig Acquisition” symposium on October 3 was a tremendous success. Thanks to all who attended and who helped organize the event. Those who...
Ann Jordan Laeuchli
The Lillian Goldman Law Library is at the same time delighted to report the publication of Ann Jordan Laeuchli’s Bibliographical Catalog of William Blackstone (Buffalo...
The Lillian Goldman Law Library andThe Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library invite the Yale community to A CELEBRATION OF THE ANTHONY TAUSSIG ACQUISITION   Friday,...
The Common Law Epitomiz'd
“The Common Law Epitomiz’d: Anthony Taussig’s Law Books” is the latest exhibit from the Yale Law Library’s Rare Book collection. It showcases the Law...
Portrait of Sir William Blackstone
“Blackstone Goes Hollywood” is the latest video production by our friend Mark Weiner. What better location to shoot a video about Sir William Blackstone than our Paskus-...
Samuel Blackerby, THE JUSTICE OF THE PEACE HIS COMPANION (London, 1711).
Among the 363 English law titles the Lillian Goldman Law Library acquired from Anthony Taussig, by far the largest group is justice of the peace (JP) manuals. Taussig wrote...

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