Illustrated law

The image of Justice, a remnant of the Renaissance, has had a remarkable run as a political icon. We can all “read” Justice because we have been taught to do so by political...
  How is it that the figure of a woman, draped, holding scales and sword, has been so widely recognized as a symbol of the law for more than 500 years? ...
    A new book by José Cárdenas Bunsen, Escritura y Derecho Canónico en la obra de fray Bartolomé de las Casas (Madrid: Iberoamericana-Vervuert, 2011),...
  There are two new sets in the Rare Book Collection’s Flickr gallery… Justitia - headpieces is part of my continuing pursuit of images of Lady Justice (or...
The Law Librarians of New England are meeting today here at the Yale Law School. In honor of their visit, I’ve posted a new gallery in our Flickr site, “Law Libraries...
  “Yes: the Dark Knight went to Yale.” That is the verdict of the Yale Alumni Magazine. Inspired by our “Superheroes in Court!” exhibit, the magazine devoted the...
Among the most outstanding illustrated law books of all times is an edition of Justinian’s Institutes published by a member of the Giunta printing dynasty of Venice,...
This past month I’ve added 44 additional images containing depictions of Justitia (Lady Justice), to our Flickr gallery Justitia: Iconography of Justice. In addition,...
Best wishes for a happy & prosperous New Year from the Rare Book Collection, Lillian Goldman Law Library. From the Bambergische Halssgerichts Ordenung (Mentz: Johann...
 The newest galleries in the Rare Book Collection’s Flickr site feature two of the most heavily illustrated books in the history of legal literature, both by the...

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