Rare Books Blog

December 27, 2013

The Lillian Goldman Law Library’s 2013 holiday card features an image from one of this year’s acquisitions. The image is the headpiece from the opening chapter in Friar Lorenzo Mascambrone’s Degli asili de’ Christiani ragionamento (Roma: Camera Appostolica, 1731). The book is a vigorous defense of the Catholic Church’s right to grant sanctuary to fugitives, published at a time when Catholic governments were protesting that the Church was coddling criminals and traitors under the guise of sanctuary, and thus threatening public order.

In The Popes and European Revolution (1981), Owen Chadwick summarized Mascambrone’s argument: “The right to punish does not derive from revenge but must intend to reform, it is inseparable in moral law from compassion. … Sanctuaries, however they are at times misused, tend to a chance of reformation. And if this is the duty and interest of the State, how much more is it the duty of the Church? Would a mother chase away a starving child, or fail to protect it from a wild animal? How much more barbarous would bishops be if they chase out of church men who have come to them seeking refuge and comfort?”

The image reinforces the book’s argument. On the left, the female cherub is seated in peaceful Nature. She points out the scales of Justice to the male cherub, holding the fasces (symbol of the magistrate’s power) as he cowers amid the ruins of human civilization. The image recalls the words of The Federalist, No. 51: “Justice is the end of government.”

Happy New Year to all!

– MIKE WIDENER, Rare Book Librarian

Headpiece, Degli asili de' Christiani ragionamento 1731

Morris L. Cohen
December 11, 2013

The Legal History and Rare Books (LH&RB) Section of the American Association of Law Libraries, in cooperation with Cengage Learning, announces the Sixth Annual Morris L. Cohen Student Essay Competition. The competition is named in honor of Morris L. Cohen, late Professor Emeritus of Law at Yale Law School. Professor Cohen was a leading scholar in the fields of legal research, rare books, and historical bibliography.

The competition is designed to encourage scholarship, and to acquaint students with the American Association of Law Libraries and law librarianship. Essays may be on any topic related to legal history, rare law books, or legal archives. The competition is open to students currently enrolled in accredited graduate programs in library science, law, history, and related fields.

The entry form and instructions are available at the LH&RB website. Entries must be submitted by 11:59 p.m., March 17, 2014.

The winner will receive a $500.00 prize from Cengage Learning and up to $1,000 for expenses associated with attendance at the AALL Annual Meeting, which is scheduled for July 12-15, 2014, in San Antonio, Texas. The runner-up will have the opportunity to publish the second-place essay in LH&RB’s online scholarly journal “Unbound: An Annual Review of Legal History and Rare Books.”

– MIKE WIDENER, Rare Book Librarian

Bryan A. Garner
December 5, 2013

Bryan A. Garner, the world’s leading legal lexicographer, will give a talk on Monday, December 9, about the exhibit of association copies from his private book collection, which is currently on display in the Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

Garner, Editor in Chief of Black’s Law Dictionary, has amassed a private collection of 36,000 books. He is particularly drawn to “association copies,” books once owned or inscribed by their authors or other significant individuals. The inscriptions, says Garner, are an “ineffable connection” with those who once signed or owned the book.

Garner’s talk is scheduled for 1pm on December 9 in Room 128 of the Yale Law School, 127 Wall Street in New Haven. A limited number of exhibit catalogues will be available for those who attend the talk.

The exhibit, “Built by Association: Books Once Owned by Notable Judges and Lawyers,” includes books inscribed by John Jay, the first chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, and Clarence Darrow, the most famous trial lawyer in American history. Other notable figures include Supreme Court Justices Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Benjamin Cardozo, and Lindley Murray, a lawyer best known as “the father of English grammar.” Three of the authors taught at Yale Law School: Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas, Judge Jerome Frank, and the iconoclastic Professor Fred Rodell.

Garner has been editor in chief of Black’s Law Dictionary since 1996. He has authored many other standard reference works in legal lexicography and legal writing, including Garner’s Dictionary of Legal Usage (3d ed. 2011), The Elements of Legal Style (2nd ed. 2002), and The Redbook: A Manual on Legal Style (3rd ed. 2013). He is the co-author with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia of Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges (2008) and Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts (2012). Garner is also the author of Garner’s Modern American Usage (3rd ed. 2009), published by Oxford University Press. Garner is the owner of LawProse, which conducts seminars in legal writing around the world. He is also Distinguished Research Professor of Law at Southern Methodist University.

Garner curated the exhibit, with assistance from Mike Widener, Rare Book Librarian in the Lillian Goldman Law Library.

The exhibit is open to the public, 9am-10pm daily, through December 18 on Level L2 of the Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School.

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